Moon Isn't Operator Of Peace, Newsweek Says

President Moon Jae-in's political fate depends on the success or failure of denuclearization talks between the U.S. and North Korea, Newsweek commented on Wednesday.

The weekly titled the cover story in the July 13 issue "Over the Moon."

"South Korea's President Played Matchmaker for Trump and Kim, But Will It End War or Start Another?" it asked.

The weekly said the U.S.-North Korea summit in Singapore on June 12 was a diplomatic and political victory for Moon, who helped broker it.

"But Trump soon produced a couple of surprises of his own that could have devastating implications for the South Korean leader and his country," it added, namely announcing after the summit that he will halt South Korea-U.S. drills and wants to bring the U.S. Forces Korea home.

"Critics in both Washington and Seoul are now nervous that Moon has set the stage for a diplomatic process that puts South Korea's fate in the hands of an unpredictable American president who could leave the country vulnerable to the North and China by cutting a deal that removes U.S. troops," it added.

The stakes are high. "Disarming the North would cement [Moon's] legacy as a power broker who helped upend decades of stalemate and usher in a new era of peace for the two Koreas. Failure, however, could cost him the presidency -- and revive the threat of a war that almost certainly would devastate greater Seoul and its 25 million people."

The weekly did not explain how it could "cost him the presidency."

Source : http://english.chosun.com/site/data/html_dir/2018/07/12/2018071201150.html

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