New Movie About Neil Armstrong

Last time, in Part 1 of this interview series with Mark Armstrong, the youngest son of the late Apollo 11 moonwalker Neil Armstrong, we discussed a number of things relating to Neil and to the recent Hollywood Apollo 11 movie, First Man. Here we continue that conversation.

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Mark Armstrong, second from left, returns to The Explorers Club a flag his father took to the Moon in 1969. Others pictured: Richard Wiese, Mike Massimino, David Concannon.

Stacey Severn

Jim Clash: If you had to say something about your late father to our readers, what would it be?

Mark Armstrong: Just that he was extraordinarily diligent about evaluating every situation and choosing the right path for the greater good. He always did that, and I think that’s an excellent role model for others to follow.

Clash: This new documentary we are about to see, Apollo 11: First Steps, what do you think of it?

Armstrong: The documentary is unusual in that it’s not narrated, there’s no one telling you what to think. It’s just the actual footage and the actual audio - the same things you saw and heard in the '60s, albeit on a much larger screen. The film presents what took place objectively, and lets the viewer decide what to think. It speaks for itself in that way, which is very refreshing. When you’re watching the film, it's just as if you were there. I applaud the filmmakers and am very happy to support them. I think it’s a great way to present something that happened 50 years ago to today’s audience, many of whom were not alive at the time, and still have it be really interesting and compelling.

Clash: When you see the 350-plus-foot Saturn V rocket in all of its glory, can you believe we took men to the Moon on it? I mean, it’s really just a giant bomb sitting on the pad full of liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen.

Armstrong: It’s a testament to all of those people and the incredible engineering work that went into creating that rocket and all the systems - and those incredible F-1 engines that were so reliable and yet so powerful. I’m still in awe at what this country was able to accomplish almost 50 years ago now, and am looking forward to getting back on that horse, if you will, and continuing to explore and push our boundaries.

Clash: Mars?

Armstrong: I think back to the Moon first, clearly. The Moon gives us a nice place, that’s close by, to learn how to solve problems of living and working in a hostile environment, such as coping with a non-breathable atmosphere or no atmosphere, mining for water, etc. There are just so many engineering challenges that we can solve by going back to the Moon first, and it makes sense to do that. What we learn on the Moon we can apply to Mars and elsewhere, and that’s very exciting.

Clash: Do you and Buzz Aldrin get along, speak much? He's a big Mars proponent.

Armstrong: Sure, I speak with Buzz and with his children, Andy and Jan, frequently as well as the [Michael] Collins family, and certainly other astronauts and their families as well. There are a number of events where we see one another, and it’s always nice to see old friends.

Clash: Tell me a little about your own career – you’re a software engineer, musician, actor.

Armstrong: You know, I don’t really like talking about myself [laughs]. There’s not much to say there. I will say this: I spent about 25 years as a software engineer, most of that in Silicon Valley, and developed some great friendships. I learned a lot from those experiences, and I carry those with me.

Part 1: Mark Armstrong, Son Of Famous Moonwalker Neil, Discusses His Late Father, Two New Apollo 11 Movies

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Last time, in Part 1 of this interview series with Mark Armstrong, the youngest son of the late Apollo 11 moonwalker Neil Armstrong, we discussed a number of things relating to Neil and to the recent Hollywood Apollo 11 movie, First Man. Here we continue that conversation.

>

Mark Armstrong, second from left, returns to The Explorers Club a flag his father took to the Moon in 1969. Others pictured: Richard Wiese, Mike Massimino, David Concannon.

Stacey Severn

Jim Clash: If you had to say something about your late father to our readers, what would it be?

Mark Armstrong: Just that he was extraordinarily diligent about evaluating every situation and choosing the right path for the greater good. He always did that, and I think that’s an excellent role model for others to follow.

Clash: This new documentary we are about to see, Apollo 11: First Steps, what do you think of it?

Armstrong: The documentary is unusual in that it’s not narrated, there’s no one telling you what to think. It’s just the actual footage and the actual audio - the same things you saw and heard in the '60s, albeit on a much larger screen. The film presents what took place objectively, and lets the viewer decide what to think. It speaks for itself in that way, which is very refreshing. When you’re watching the film, it's just as if you were there. I applaud the filmmakers and am very happy to support them. I think it’s a great way to present something that happened 50 years ago to today’s audience, many of whom were not alive at the time, and still have it be really interesting and compelling.

Clash: When you see the 350-plus-foot Saturn V rocket in all of its glory, can you believe we took men to the Moon on it? I mean, it’s really just a giant bomb sitting on the pad full of liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen.

Armstrong: It’s a testament to all of those people and the incredible engineering work that went into creating that rocket and all the systems - and those incredible F-1 engines that were so reliable and yet so powerful. I’m still in awe at what this country was able to accomplish almost 50 years ago now, and am looking forward to getting back on that horse, if you will, and continuing to explore and push our boundaries.

Clash: Mars?

Armstrong: I think back to the Moon first, clearly. The Moon gives us a nice place, that’s close by, to learn how to solve problems of living and working in a hostile environment, such as coping with a non-breathable atmosphere or no atmosphere, mining for water, etc. There are just so many engineering challenges that we can solve by going back to the Moon first, and it makes sense to do that. What we learn on the Moon we can apply to Mars and elsewhere, and that’s very exciting.

Clash: Do you and Buzz Aldrin get along, speak much? He's a big Mars proponent.

Armstrong: Sure, I speak with Buzz and with his children, Andy and Jan, frequently as well as the [Michael] Collins family, and certainly other astronauts and their families as well. There are a number of events where we see one another, and it’s always nice to see old friends.

Clash: Tell me a little about your own career – you’re a software engineer, musician, actor.

Armstrong: You know, I don’t really like talking about myself [laughs]. There’s not much to say there. I will say this: I spent about 25 years as a software engineer, most of that in Silicon Valley, and developed some great friendships. I learned a lot from those experiences, and I carry those with me.

Part 1: Mark Armstrong, Son Of Famous Moonwalker Neil, Discusses His Late Father, Two New Apollo 11 Movies

Source : https://www.forbes.com/sites/jimclash/2019/05/24/mark-armstrong-son-of-moonwalker-neil-gives-thumbs-up-to-new-documentary-apollo-11-first-steps/

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