What You Need To Know About The New Shingles Vaccine

It’s good — so good that demand has been higher than its maker apparently anticipated.

As a result, supplies of the new shingles vaccine, Shingrix, have been spotty nationwide. Reports indicate that some pharmacy chains have created waiting lists, particularly for customers who’ve gotten the first recommended dose of the vaccine and are seeking the second. Pharmacists at two independent pharmacies in the Omaha area, however, say they’ve been able to draw on multiple suppliers to keep the vaccine in stock, at least for now.

Supplies could get tighter once flu shot season starts, local pharmacists say. That’s when people typically come in seeking vaccinations.

“My advice is not to panic,” said pharmacist Marty Feltner, vaccine coordinator for Kohll’s Pharmacy & Homecare in Omaha. “Put your name on a wait list, and we’ll just continue to order.”

Shingrix, approved last fall, now is the vaccine preferred by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for prevention not only of shingles but also of the severe nerve pain that can linger in its wake. Caused by a rekindling of the virus that causes chicken pox, shingles affects one in three adults in their lifetime, causing a painful rash and blisters. There are about a million cases in the United States each year. The new vaccine is recommended for people 50 and older.

Dr. Rudolf Kotula, an infectious disease physician with Methodist Physicians Clinic in Omaha, said the new vaccine remains very effective even as people age.

“Whether you are 50 or 90, the vaccine is more than 90 percent effective,” Kotula said. “It really protects the public from an occurrence or recurrence of shingles, which is very painful.”

While shingles can occur at any age, the risk of developing it increases with age, starting at 50. About half of all cases occur in people age 60 or older.

People apparently have gotten the message. Demand for Shingrix has been high since it became available in the U.S. earlier this year.

“It’s a better vaccine,” Kotula said, “and I think the company was not prepared for such huge interest.”

Lisa Larson on Friday received the new shingles vaccine, administered with a shot, at Kohll’s Pharmacy near 51st and L Streets. Larson, 52, of Bellevue, had shingles about 10 years ago. She doesn’t want the viral infection again.

“It’s horrible,” she said. “Very, very painful.”

She’d gotten the old vaccine but wanted the better protection that studies indicate the new one provides.

The CDC noted on its vaccine shortage page that manufacturer GlaxoSmithKline has increased the U.S. supply available for 2018 and plans to release doses on a consistent and predictable schedule throughout the rest of the year. The company has told federal agencies that there is enough to vaccinate more patients in 2018 than were vaccinated against shingles in 2017.

Kotula said Methodist’s clinics have a limited supply of the vaccine, which arrives in small amounts.

A CVS spokeswoman said in an email that the pharmacy chain has been getting shipments incrementally. With the demand, however, “It has become challenging to keep an ample supply across all of our more than 9,800 stores due to supply restrictions from the manufacturer,” she wrote.

Both CVS and Walgreens are advising customers to call their local stores in advance to find out if they have Shingrix. Some of the chains’ stores reportedly are keeping waiting lists and calling customers when the vaccine is available.

Feltner, the Kohll’s pharmacist, said all Kohll’s locations currently have the vaccine. He’s been ordering from multiple suppliers to keep it coming.

“We’re doing our best to find the vaccine to keep it in stock and meet the community demand,” he said, noting that it’s probably best to call ahead just in case.

Kubat Pharmacy in Omaha also has the vaccine in stock, said pharmacist Jim Quinley. He, too, has been tapping multiple suppliers.

“We did have a waiting list for a couple of weeks,” he said. “We got a big shipment in and got it cleared.”

Both Feltner and Quinley said they’ve seen customers who’ve gotten a first dose at a pharmacy chain but couldn’t get the second.

The CDC recommends that people get the second dose of the vaccine two to six months after the first. However, Dr. Mark Rupp, professor and chief of the University of Nebraska Medical Center’s infectious diseases division, said there is “some wiggle room” on the timing of the second shot.

“If you go past that, you don’t need to repeat that first dose,” he said.

Rupp said one in 10 people who get the vaccine will have some side effects for up to three days: muscle aches, low-grade fevers and headaches, as well as more redness and swelling at the injection site than with most shots. But they’re a “far cry” from the symptoms associated with shingles.

“It looks like it’s a really good addition to our tool chest for preventing an illness that can really be debilitating for some folks,” he said.

This report includes material from the Washington Post.

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Float spas, where users are suspended in a salty bath, started popping up in Omaha in 2016. Spa-goers enter a private float tank nearly double the size of a bathtub. Hundreds of pounds of Epsom salt have been dissolved in the shallow pool of water so people float on top. Proponents say floating reduces muscle and joint pain, shortens recovery time from athletic training or injuries, relieves stress and increases creativity. Click here to read a World-Herald story on float spas.

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Local yogis can find their flow among a tribe of baby goats. Two dairies in Honey Creek, Iowa, started offering the classes in 2018. The goat yoga trend started in Oregon in 2016 and has since swept most of the country. The wandering goats add some levity to yoga, known for improving flexibility and decreasing stress. Click here to read a previous World-Herald story on goat yoga.

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Kickball isn't just for kids. Adult kickball leagues have joined the mix of recreational sports in Omaha, much like sand volleyball and softball. The sport gets players moving, but it doesn't feel like a grueling workout. Some kickballers called it "exercise in disguise." Click here to read a World-Herald story on kickball.

Barre Buy Now
  • KENT SIEVERS/THE WORLD-HERALD

Ballet-inspired workouts made their way to the Omaha area back in 2014. The city is home to handful of studios purely devoted to the workouts, which combine yoga, Pilates and ballet movements performed on a dance barre. Some local gyms and fitness studios offer the classes, too. Instructors said the classes are fun and motivating. Click here to read a World-Herald story on barre.

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Rowing isn't new, but it's made a splash on the local fitness scene. The exercise machines had fallen out of favor thanks to treadmills, weight rooms and group exercise classes. But they've been reintroduced through fitness trends like CrossFit and Orangetheory. At least two local studios have debuted classes built around the machines. Click here to read a World-Herald story on rowing.

Cryotherapy Buy Now
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Participants — wearing minimal clothing — stand in a chamber that looks like an aluminum can and grows colder over two to three minutes using liquid nitrogen. The temperature drops to between negative 200 and 240 degrees. Proponents say the high-tech ice baths reduce inflammation, relieve pain, prevent injury, increase energy and speed healing. The practice also has been credited for cosmetic benefits. But some medical professionals are skeptical. Click here to read a World-Herald story on cryotherapy.

Orangetheory Fitness Buy Now
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Exercisers bask in glowing orange lights and blaring upbeat music at Orangetheory Fitness. The metro area now is home to a handful of the studios, which got their start in Florida in 2009. During the classes, a trainer leads people through a circuit-style workout that rotates between treadmills, rowing machines and a strength area with free weights. Members wear heart rate monitors to track their efforts during a workout. Click here to read a World-Herald story on Orangetheory Fitness

Pound Buy Now
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Pound classes debuted in Omaha in 2015. The classes are a full-body strength and cardio workout that simulates drumming. Exercisers pound the drumsticks in the air, against each other and on the ground while performing strength exercises like squats and lunges. Click here to read a World-Herald story on Pound.

Aerial yoga Buy Now
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11 fitness trends in Omaha

Many fitness trends have landed in the Omaha area. Here's a handful we've found over the years.

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> Float spas Buy Now
  • KENT SIEVERS/THE WORLD-HERALD

Float spas, where users are suspended in a salty bath, started popping up in Omaha in 2016. Spa-goers enter a private float tank nearly double the size of a bathtub. Hundreds of pounds of Epsom salt have been dissolved in the shallow pool of water so people float on top. Proponents say floating reduces muscle and joint pain, shortens recovery time from athletic training or injuries, relieves stress and increases creativity. Click here to read a World-Herald story on float spas.

> Bubble soccer Buy Now
  • SARAH HOFFMAN/OMAHA WORLD-HERALD

If you've been dreaming of dribbling a soccer ball while encased in a plastic bubble, you're in luck. That trend made its way to Omaha in 2015. The game can be tough — experienced players tumble right alongside first-timers. Click here to read a World-Herald story on bubble soccer.

> Goat yoga Buy Now
  • SARAH HOFFMAN/THE WORLD-HERALD

Local yogis can find their flow among a tribe of baby goats. Two dairies in Honey Creek, Iowa, started offering the classes in 2018. The goat yoga trend started in Oregon in 2016 and has since swept most of the country. The wandering goats add some levity to yoga, known for improving flexibility and decreasing stress. Click here to read a previous World-Herald story on goat yoga.

> Adult kickball Buy Now
  • MATT DIXON/THE WORLD-HERALD

Kickball isn't just for kids. Adult kickball leagues have joined the mix of recreational sports in Omaha, much like sand volleyball and softball. The sport gets players moving, but it doesn't feel like a grueling workout. Some kickballers called it "exercise in disguise." Click here to read a World-Herald story on kickball.

> Barre Buy Now
  • KENT SIEVERS/THE WORLD-HERALD

Ballet-inspired workouts made their way to the Omaha area back in 2014. The city is home to handful of studios purely devoted to the workouts, which combine yoga, Pilates and ballet movements performed on a dance barre. Some local gyms and fitness studios offer the classes, too. Instructors said the classes are fun and motivating. Click here to read a World-Herald story on barre.

> Rowing Buy Now
  • REBECCA S. GRATZ/THE WORLD-HERALD

Rowing isn't new, but it's made a splash on the local fitness scene. The exercise machines had fallen out of favor thanks to treadmills, weight rooms and group exercise classes. But they've been reintroduced through fitness trends like CrossFit and Orangetheory. At least two local studios have debuted classes built around the machines. Click here to read a World-Herald story on rowing.

> Cryotherapy Buy Now
  • REBECCA S. GRATZ/THE WORLD-HERALD

Participants — wearing minimal clothing — stand in a chamber that looks like an aluminum can and grows colder over two to three minutes using liquid nitrogen. The temperature drops to between negative 200 and 240 degrees. Proponents say the high-tech ice baths reduce inflammation, relieve pain, prevent injury, increase energy and speed healing. The practice also has been credited for cosmetic benefits. But some medical professionals are skeptical. Click here to read a World-Herald story on cryotherapy.

> Orangetheory Fitness Buy Now
  • BRENDAN SULLIVAN/THE WORLD-HERALD

Exercisers bask in glowing orange lights and blaring upbeat music at Orangetheory Fitness. The metro area now is home to a handful of the studios, which got their start in Florida in 2009. During the classes, a trainer leads people through a circuit-style workout that rotates between treadmills, rowing machines and a strength area with free weights. Members wear heart rate monitors to track their efforts during a workout. Click here to read a World-Herald story on Orangetheory Fitness

> Pound Buy Now
  • MATT MILLER/THE WORLD-HERALD

Pound classes debuted in Omaha in 2015. The classes are a full-body strength and cardio workout that simulates drumming. Exercisers pound the drumsticks in the air, against each other and on the ground while performing strength exercises like squats and lunges. Click here to read a World-Herald story on Pound.

> Aerial yoga Buy Now
  • ALYSSA SCHUKAR/THE WORLD-HERALD

Aerial yoga blends yoga poses with acrobatics. Yogis practice in hammocks, flipping upside-down. It incorporates stretching and strength exercises, cardio and meditation. Instructors say the class is good for the spine, alleviating pressure — although there are some risks, and the class isn't for everyone. Click here to read a World-Herald story on aerial yoga.

> Heart rate monitors Buy Now
  • SARAH HOFFMAN/THE WORLD-HERALD

Heart rate monitors are a standard part of curriculum for some metro high school students. They've also made an appearance in several boutique gyms. Teachers at Mercy High School said wearing the monitors prep students for a lifetime of fitness. Click here to read a World-Herald story on the monitors.

Source : https://www.omaha.com/livewellnebraska/health/new-shingles-vaccine-works-so-well-supplies-have-started-running/article_62697a4e-e129-57a5-a058-e613ef258c15.html

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What You Need To Know About The New Shingles Vaccine

Source:Omaha

What You Need To Know About The New Shingles Vaccine

What You Need To Know About The New Shingles Vaccine

Source:WWSB

What You Need To Know About The New Shingles Vaccine

What You Need To Know About The New Shingles Vaccine

Source:WCAX

What You Need To Know About The New Shingles Vaccine